Major In Folklore

The concentration in folklore emphasizes the study of creativity and aesthetic expression in everyday life. The study of folklore focuses attention on those expressive realms that communities infuse with cultural meaning and through which they give voice to the issues and concerns they see as central to their being. These realms are often deeply grounded in tradition, yet as community self-definitions develop in light of shifting social, political, and economic realities, community-based artistry likewise evolves. Folklore thus moves beyond the study of the old and time-honored to explore emergent meanings and cultural forms. The primary vehicle for the exploration of contemporary folklore is ethnographic field work, the real-world study of people’s lives in everyday settings, grounded in conversation and participatory engagement. The major in American studies with a concentration in folklore consists of nine courses in the following categories. An up-to-date list of all courses available to students within these categories can be found in the Undergraduate Catalog by clicking on this link.

Introduction (one)

Core Content Courses (four)

Ethnographic Intensive Courses (two)

Electives (two)

Folklore Minor

The undergraduate minor in folklore consists of five courses in the following categories. An up-to-date list of all courses available to students within these categories can be found in the Undergraduate Catalog by clicking on this link.

Introduction (one)

Core Content Courses (three)

Ethnographic Intensive Courses (one)

Additional Information For Majors & Minors

From time to time, current or visiting faculty will offer additional Folklore courses not listed here. The Program will post these to the semester’s course listing and will determine–on a course-by-course basis–which requirements each will fill.

Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Coordinator of Folklore Program with any questions.