Summer 2013

AMST/HIST 110: Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America
Daniel Cobb, Monday through Friday, 9:00-12:15, Greenlaw 222
Maymester.  An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience.

AMST 269: Mating and Marriage in American Culture
Tim Marr, Monday through Friday, 1:15-4:30, Greenlaw 318
Maymester.   Interdisciplinary examination of the married condition from colonial times to the present.   Themes include courtship and romance, marital power and the egalitarian ideal, challenges to monogamy.

AMST 484: Visual Culture
Erin Corrales-Diaz, Monday through Friday, 9:45-11:15, Greenlaw 318
This course investigates how we make and signify meaning through images, ranging from art to advertising to graffiti, and provides the critical tools to understand the visual worlds we inhabit.

AMST 201: Literary Approaches to American Studies
Ben Bolling, Monday through Friday, 11:30-1:00, Greenlaw 317
A study of interdisciplinary methods and the concept of American studies with an emphasis on the historical context for literary texts.

AMST 290: Topics in American Studies — The Civil War in Popular Culture
Kimberly Kutz, Monday through Friday, 9:45-11:15, Greenlaw 319
This summer, we will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg, the turning point of the Civil War and the focus of Abraham Lincoln’s most famous speech, which he delivered four months later to dedicate the battlefield cemetery.  Although Lincoln erred in thinking that the world would little note or long remember what he said that day, he was correct in his prediction that we would not forget what the soldiers did in the Civil War.  But how would we remember?  Since 1865, popular depictions of the war’s course, causes and consequences have radically changed as Americans have adjusted their notions of racial justice, gender roles, and class relations.  This course will explore how popular culture has both reflected and shaped how Americans have viewed the Civil War and its legacy.  Topics will include wartime photography, illustration, and music; soldier’s memoirs; films such as Birth of a Nation, Gone with the Wind, and Glory; novels and short stories set during the war; and historical commemoration, statuary, and reenactment.

ANTH/FOLK 334: Art, Myth, and Nature
Norris Johnson, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Hanes Art 117
Cross-cultural study of form, image, and meaning in painting, drawing, and sculpture. Emphasis on the interrelationship of religion, nature, and image-making in selected prehistoric and contemporary sociocultural traditions.

Fall 2013

AMST 089-001  FYS: Spcl Tpcs: Native American Artists

MWF 2:00-2:50
Tone-Pah-Hote, J.

Description:
This course examines the lives, works, and representation of Native American artists though biographical and autobiographical texts, articles, books, and though art itself. It also encourages students to critically examine and analyze representations of Native artists and the items they have produced.  In class students will analyze multifaceted roles that Native American artists play within their families, communities, and the world at large. This course connects Native American artists and art to vital conversations in American Indian studies such as colonialism, identity, gender, and tribal sovereignty. It also explores how Native people and others have constructed and contested the idea of the “Native American Artist.”  Why is this so contentious?  What do the lives of Native artists tell us about how Native people have been represented by themselves and others?    How have the represented themselves not just though their art but through texts as well?

The reading for this semester include articles and the following books:  Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong, Firelight:  The Life of Angel DeCora, Winnebago Artist, and North American Indian Art. 

AMST 202-001  Historical Approaches to Amer. Studies

MWF 2:00-2:50
Kotch, S.

Description:
A study of interdisciplinary methods and the concept of American studies with an emphasis on historical and cultural analysis.

AMST 235-001  Twentieth-Century Native America (Xlist HIST 235)

MWF 10:00-10:50
Tone-Pah-Hote, J.

Description:
This course explores the multiple ways that American Indians navigated cultural, political, and economic changes in the twentieth century.  Opening with assimilation policy in the 1880’s and extending to contemporary struggles for autonomy, the class emphasizes the continuities of American Indian life ways and their adaptability to changing cultural and political landscapes.  It also examines three important, interrelated questions. First, how have American Indian peoples maintained sovereignty as Native nations and autonomy as individuals in the shifting contexts of the twentieth century?  How have federal policies shaped the lived experiences of American Indians?  Finally, how have they responded to and resisted these policies?  This course approaches these questions though historical texts, literature, and film. The readings for this semester include articles and the following books: Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism Since 1900, Boarding School Seasons, and Like a Hurricane:  The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee.

This course is cross-listed with History 235.

AMST 246-001  Indigenous Storytelling

TR 12:30-1:45
Teuton, C.

Description:
Offers a historically, politically, and culturally contextualized examination of Native America through oral, written, and visual storytelling. Covering a wide range of genres, including oral narratives, novels, and visual arts, this introductory course showcases the fluidity of Indigenous artistic forms and their continuing centrality in Native America.

AMST 365-001  Women and Detective Fiction

MWF 10:00-10:50
Robinson, M.

Description:

This course will trace the origins of detective fiction and major developments in the history of the genre with a focus on women authors and protagonists. We will examine amateur sleuths, private investigators and police detectives in fiction and film, with close attention to historical and social contexts and to theoretical arguments related to popular fiction, genre studies, and gender.  Our readings will include Pauline Hopkin’s “Talma Gordon,” Sara Paretksy’s Indemnity Only, Miyuki Miyabe’s All She Was Worth, and Stieg Larsson’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, as well as classic texts by Edgar Allan Poe, Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers.

AMST 390-001  Sem. in American Studies: Indigenous Decolonization

TR 9:30-10:45
Teuton, C.

Description:
Seminar in American studies topics with a focus on historical inquiry from interdisciplinary angles.

AMST 392-001  Radical Communities in 20th-Cent Amer. Religious History

MWF 2:00-2:50
Robinson, M.

Description:
The goal of this course is to examine some of the radical developments in American religious history from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. We will consider how the language, ideas, and cultural products of religious outsiders responded to and influenced mainstream ideas about what American communities could (and should) look like in terms of gender, race, economics, and faith-based practices. We will closely examine primary documents (sermons, short stories, documentary films, newspaper articles) by believers and their critics, secondary sources by historians, and documentary films, in order to think about the challenges these religious outsiders posed to religious, social, and political institutions in the United States. Our studies may include the Ghost Dance Religion, Mary Baker Eddy’s Christian Science, early Pentecostalism, the Catholic Worker Movement, Nation of Islam, Jim Jones’s Peoples Temple and other movements.

AMST 394-001  The University in American Life: The University of North Carolina

T 9:30-10:45
Willis, R.

Description:
Core lectures on higher education and UNC are the focus of the plenary sessions, with guest lectures from key participants in past and current University life.   All students participate jointly in the Tuesday plenary sessions as well as one of the three small seminar offerings.  AMST 394L will not be offered this fall.

FALL 2013 offerings:
001 – Tues. 9.30-10.45, The Role of the University in American Life, Plenary Sessions, Rachel Willis
601- Tues. 5.00-6.15, Merit and Privilege in the American University, Stephen Farmer
602 – Thur. 9.30-10.45, College Completion & Economic Development, Emily Williamson Gangi
603 – Tues. 5.00-6.15, Change and Innovation in Higher Education, Courtney Thornton

AMST 394-601  The University in American Life (Rec)

T 5:00-6:15
Willis, TA

AMST 394-602  The University in American Life (Rec)

R 9:30-10:45
Willis, TA

AMST 394-603  The University in American Life (Rec)

R 5:00-6:15
Willis, TA

AMST 482-001  Images of American Landscapes

TR 9:30-10:45
Roberts, K.

Description:
This course introduces students to the concept of landscape and how it developed in the Western context.  We consider how the idea of landscape shapes the way we look at our physical surroundings.  The course progresses thematically, covering different analytical perspectives on landscape studies, such as experience (phenomenological approaches), consumption and the geographic gaze.  Toward the end of the course, we consider several particular landscapes in light of our theoretical readings: urban, rural and university.  We take class fieldtrips to visit and analyze these landscapes together.

AMST 484-001  Visual Culture

TR 11:00-12:15
Herman, B.

Description:
Visual Culture investigates the ways in which we make and signify meaning through images. We cross boundaries looking at objects ranging from the fine arts to advertising to film to comics to websites. Our conversations range from the history of visualizing Sherlock Holmes to the street politics of graffitti. This course provides you with the critical tools to scrutinize and understand the visual worlds we inhabit.

AMST 498-001  Advanced Seminar in American Studies

W 3:00-5:50
STAFF

Description:
Graduate or junior/senior standing. Examines American civilization by studying social and cultural history, criticism, art, architecture, music, film, popular pastimes, and amusements, among other possible topics.

AMST 700-001  The History and Practices of American Studies

T 3:30-6:20
Kasson, Joy

Description:
The History and Practices of American Studies will acquaint students with the texts, contexts, issues, and controversies in American Studies as an ongoing field of study. It will also examine topics, perspectives, theoretical approaches of the most important current work in American Studies scholarship. From its birth in the early decades of the twentieth century as an interdisciplinary examination of American intellectual and cultural history and literature, American Studies has grown to include visual and popular culture studies, performance studies, transnational perspectives, as well as gender and ethnic studies.  Self-reflexive about its twentieth-century origins, American Studies today addresses questions of its own cultural politics and also promotes new scholarship from a variety of perspectives. At UNC, American Studies encompasses Southern Studies, Folklore, American Indian Studies, and the digital humanities; what assumptions and methodologies inform such a variety of pursuits?  Graduate students from a variety of departments are welcome to join this interdisciplinary investigation of the field of American Studies.

AMST 850-001  Digital Humanities Practicum

T 6:00-8:50
Allen, R.

Description:
NOTE: Instructor Permission Required

Instructor: Robert C. Allen
James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies
Co-Director, Digital Innovation Lab
rallen@email.unc.edu

This practicum blends traditional graduate seminar discussions with hands-on training and experience in the digital humanities. Students will work alongside DH practitioners in the Digital Innovation Lab, contributing to real-life projects that emphasize trans-domain, collaborative work. DIL projects share a commitment to engaged scholarship, representing partnerships with local communities. The practicum gives students the opportunity to pursue a set of professional development goals for themselves. Students will emerge from this practicum with a deeper understanding of digital humanities approaches, practices and issues, all of which will have be applied to their own project-based work and training.

Enrollment for this course is limited and is by permission of instructor. Please email Professor Allen with a statement of interest. Enrollment is open to MA and PHD students at UNC and (via interinstitutional registration) to graduate students at Duke, and NCSU.  Disciplinary diversity is valued.

Structure
The DIL Graduate DH Practicum combines hands-on training in a real-world DH laboratory setting with regular seminar-styled meetings and engagement with a broader Carolina DH community. There are three main components to the DH Practicum:

1. Lab Work
Students will contribute 8 hours/week to ongoing project work in the DIL, as assigned and monitored by the instructor in consultation with the DIL Manager.  The particular role each student will play within the project team will depend upon his/her skills, background, professional goals, and experience in relation to the needs of the project.   The DIL is committed to maintaining an ambitious and diverse project agenda focused on 1) the development of digital humanities tools, platforms, and work processes, 2) the testing of these tools in practical application through collaborative projects with faculty, other university units, cultural heritage organizations, and other universities, 3) project-based work developed through the programmatic expression of the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative , including the DIL/IAH Faculty Fellowship Program, Postdoctoral Fellows Program, and CDHI-supported faculty.  Students may also propose new interdisciplinary, collaborative projects.  Approval of these new projects by the instructor is contingent upon their fit with the mission and priorities of the DIL, the capability of the student to undertake the project proposed, technical requirements, and the capacity of the DIL to support them.

Students will work closely with the DIL Manager to develop a set of professional development goals at the beginning of the semester (for instance, learning XML, or gaining experience in project management). They will draft a roadmap to achieving these goals by setting milestones which will help them stay on track and reassess their progress as necessary. They will blog regularly (minimum once/week), reflecting on their experience and their progress towards meeting their goals.

Students will submit a final reflection blog post (approx. 3000 words) at the end of the semester.

2. Biweekly Seminars
In addition to working in the Lab, the Practicum will provide a regular opportunity for engaged conversations about the theoretical and conceptual issues and challenges raised by the project upon which they are working.  The purpose of these seminars (alternate Tuesdays, 431 Greenlaw)  is to offer a theoretical underpinning for the students’ work in the Lab, while exposing students to a broad range of DH practices and issues. A portion of the seminar may be devoted to discussing Lab work.

3. Triangle DH Network Seminars
On alternate Tuesdays, course participants will meet jointly with DH courses being taught at Duke (Data Visualization, Mark Olsen) and NCSU (Spatial History, Matthew Booker) at the National Humanities Center in the Research Triangle Park (6-8:50 pm.).  These sessions will typically begin with a presentation/Q&A by an area DH theorist/practitioner, open to fellows at the National Humanities Center, followed by a joint seminar-style meeting of all three classes.

FOLK 077-001  FYS: The Poetic Roots of HipHop

TR 12:30-1:45
Hinson, G.

Description:
“There ain’t nothing new about rapping.”  That’s what elders from a host of African American communities declared when hip-hop first exploded onto the scene.  This “new” form, they claimed, was just a skilled re-working of poetic forms that had been around for generations.  Each elder seemed to point to a different form—some to the wordplay of rhyming radio deejays, others to the bawdy flow of street-corner poets, still others to the rhymed storytelling of sanctified singers.  And each was right; elegant rhyming has indeed marked African American talk for generations.  Yet because most such rhyming was spoken, its history remains hidden.  This seminar will explore this lost history, searching the historical record to uncover hidden heritages of African American eloquence, rhymed storytelling, and sharp social critique.  Our goal is nothing short of re-writing hip-hop’s history, by revealing the everyday poetries that, for generations, have defined what it means to be African American.   Towards this end, students will both meet with oral poets and conduct original archival research, leading to team-based class presentations and individual papers.  Throughout the semester, students will also attend a range of poetic events, thus honing their skills at hearing and appreciating the eloquence that surrounds us all.

FOLK 202-001  Introduction Folklore   (ENGL/ANTH 202)

MW 12:00-12:50
Taylor, Mike

Description:
In daily life, we all draw upon skills and ideas we’ve learned through observation, imitation, and practice.  Consciously or not, each of us incorporates existing patterns into the ways we interact and communicate with those around us.  By means of our personal choices and actions, each of us also changes these patterns slightly, making traditions or customs our own.  Folklorists study these informal processes and the materials thereby communicated and transformed, that is, the materials we come to think of as vernacular or traditional culture.  By focusing in particular on the aesthetic aspects of vernacular culture—on patterns of expression that appeal to the senses—folklorists seek to understand how people interpret and make sense of the world.  The study of folklore asks how, in a world flooded with commercial and highly refined cultural products, people use those particular materials that they themselves create and re-shape in order to express who they are, where they belong, and what they value.  In this course we will look at diverse forms (or “genres”) of folklore, including song, architecture, legend, and food.  We will consider how vernacular expressive culture is learned, what it does for people, and why these processes and products persist through time and space.  Students will be introduced to the discipline of Folklore’s central research methodology, ethnography, and have an opportunity to practice that approach in individual and group research projects.

This course is cross-listed with ENGL/ANTH 202.
Note: Students enrolling in FOLK 202-001 are also required to enroll in one recitation section numbered FOLK 202-601 through FOLK 202-604.

FOLK 202-601  Introduction Folklore   (recitation)

R 3:30-4:45
Taylor, TA

FOLK 202-602  Introduction Folklore   (recitation)

F 11:00-11:50
Taylor, TA

FOLK 202-603  Introduction Folklore   (recitation)

F 12:00-12:50
Taylor, TA

FOLK 202-604  Introduction Folklore   (recitation)

F 12:00-12:50
Taylor, TA

FOLK 487-001  Folk Narrative (ENGL 487)

MWF 10:00-10:50
Sawin, P.

Description:
To be human is to tell stories and to feel the pull of the stories others tell.  These days we have almost limitless access to stories offered in the highly produced, dramatized versions of TV and movies, yet other—personal and/or traditional—narrative forms continue to fascinate.  In daily informal communication we craft stories to recount and make sense of our own experience.  Traditional fairytales allow us to revel in the fanciful while exploring our fondest dreams or deepest fears.  Legends and rumors straddle the divide between the known and the uncertain, engaging us in a debate over what to believe and what is believable. Some stories encapsulate what is unique about a particular time, place, person, or culture.  Others, found with variations in widely separated places and times, challenge us to consider the source of such ubiquitous appeal. Through telling and listening to stories we share knowledge, figure out who we are and what we might become, debate what really happened, stretch our imaginations, and internalize some cultural norms while challenging others. We encounter these stories in daily face-to-face encounters, in their iteration and transformation in TV and film, and, increasingly, shared through new social media.  In this course we ask: What is the appeal of these three classic kinds of stories: personal narratives, legends, and folktales?  What makes a “good” story? What is “traditional” about stories transformed so many times in so many contexts?  Why do we come back time and again to familiar tropes and patterns?  What clues hint at implicit meanings not evident on the surface?  Students will collect stories shared in person or in mediated contexts and learn how to choose among and apply the most relevant theoretical perspectives to reveal their evolving significance.

This course is cross-listed with ENGL 487.

FOLK 571-001  Southern Music

TR 8:00-9:15
Ferris, W.

Description:
This course explores the music of the American South and considers how this music serves as a window on the region’s history and culture.  We will first consider the South and how the region’s distinctive sense of place defines music in each generation.  From the Mississippi Delta to Harlan County, Kentucky, from small farms to urban neighborhoods, from the region itself to more distant worlds of the southern diaspora, southern music chronicles places and the people who live within them.

Our course covers a vast span of southern music and its roots, from ballads to hip hop, with numerous stops and side-trips along the way.  We will examine the differences between bluegrass and country, zydeco and Cajun, and black and white gospel.  We will also study the influences of southern music on American classical music, art, dance, literature, and food.

We will consider how field recordings were made by collectors and the impact of these recordings on contemporary music.  We will also view documentary films on southern music and will consider how these films enrich our understanding of each musical tradition.

FOLK 790-001  Public Folklore

TR 2:00-3:15
Hinson, G.

Description:
This graduate seminar addresses the world of public folklore, exploring theory and praxis in public sector cultural work.   Focusing on the ways that cultural workers (folklorists and others) bring their understandings to broader publics, and the ways that we can convey these understandings in full collaboration with the communities being represented, this course explores broad issues of representation, cultural politics, touristic display, and culturally-based economic development.  While so doing, it remains eminently pragmatic, drawing participants into conversation with public folklorists, inviting them to attend (and assess) public folklore events, and charting the ways that public cultural outreach translates in the 21st century.  At the seminar’s close, each participant will have written a fundable proposal for a public folklore project.

FOLK 850-001  Approaches to Folklore Theory

M 2:00-4:50
Sawin, P.

Description:
Folklore is not a thing, let alone a single, determinate object. It is, rather, a category of cultural analysis and a way of looking at our cultural world. It was developed as part of the project of European Modernity and had significantly different definitions and impacts in succeeding eras.  Indeed, the “problem” with folklore (in the sense of both a practical challenge and a fascinating intellectual question) is that folklore is taken to stand for so many different partially overlapping or even contradictory objects. What, then, might it mean or entail to study folklore in the 21st century? This graduate seminar is designed to do three things. First, the readings provide one relatively systematic overview of many of the major issues and perspectives that have characterized the study of folklore over the past two centuries and more. Second, written work will require students to apply selected theories to bodies of data in order to understand the continuous process whereby theory illuminates data and data inform new theory. Third and perhaps most importantly, our discussion is intended to model a way of thinking historically about the discipline, recognizing how definitions of the folk and folklore and consequent ideas about the social role of folklore and what questions one might productively ask of such material have emerged from the political and social developments of various periods. Students’ challenge will be to use this perspective to develop a form of folklore study that responds progressively to the realities of the global culture in which we now operate.

CHER 101-001  Elementary Cherokee II

MW 4:15-5:30
TBA

Description:
Students develop basic knowledge of the Cherokee-speaking world.  Using linguistic and content-based material, students will learn basic Cherokee.

 

Spring 2014

AMST101. The Emergence of Modern America
Instructor: Dr. Joy Kasson
Monday/Wednesday, 12:00-12:50pm, Greenlaw 101 plus one Recitation Section (Thursday 12:30pm, 2:00pm, Friday 11:00am, 12:00pm)
This course traces major themes in American culture as viewed through history, literature, art, film, music, politics, and popular culture, from the American Revolution to the present. It is not a comprehensive survey but rather an examination of the ways in which history and the arts interrelate as the present emerges from the past. Topics include American diversity, the natural environment, the rise of the cities, social criticism, the cultural impact of war. Readings consist of primary sources: poetry (Walt Whitman), fiction (Ernest Hemingway and Tim O’Brien), and autobiography (Frederick Douglass and Jane Addams). Each unit will include the work of an artist or photographer, such as Thomas Cole, Matthew Brady, Jacob Riis, Dorothea Lange. Topics include the heritage of the American Revolution; slavery, Civil War, and memory; technology and the environment; writers, film-makers, and artists as social critics.

AMST201. Literary Approaches to American Studies
Instructor: Dr. Michelle Robinson
Monday/Wednesday 5:00-6:15pm, Greenlaw 302
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary methods of American Studies, as well as an overview of major developments in the field of American Studies and contemporary approaches to the study of American society and culture. Our examination of American life will focus on four historical moments. First, we will explore representations of race, gender, and citizenship in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with a focus on depictions of the Spanish-American War and the U.S. occupation of the Philippines, as well as more recent reflections on Filipino identity in fiction and film. Next, we will study Jack Kerouac’s The Subterraneans (1958) and the cultural impact of the Beat Generation, as well as the commodification of “beatnik” culture and Beat philosophy in Hollywood films such as Funny Face (dir. Stanley Donen, 1957). We will also study the genesis of Affirmative Action policies, John Rawl’s contractarianism (and its critics), and multiculturalism in America, using Supreme Court cases and Ellen Raskin’s Newberry Award-winning book for children The Westing Game (1979) as primary texts. Finally, we will read Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, examining the economic impact of globalization, the rise of new religious movements in the late twentieth century, and contemporary attitudes toward race, disability and immigration.

AMST202. Historical Approaches to American Studies
Instructor: Dr. Seth Kotch
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45pm, Murphey 204
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary methods of American Studies scholarship with an emphasis on the importance of historical analysis. Together, driven by your discussion of course texts, we will seek to understand historic and contemporary conflicts over American identity and how history is used and misused today. Since we are here in the South, we will focus in particular on this region, though without ignoring the rest of the country. This course is divided into four units. The first will introduce you to some of the essential concepts in play in American Studies and liberal arts scholarship. Then we will consider four broad subjects: southern identity, gender and sexuality, American national identity, and the role of natural and constructed spaces in shaping American history and culture. Each unit will move from the post-Civil War period to the modern day.

AMST203. Approaches to American Indian Studies
Instructor: Dr. Chris Teuton
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00-10:50am, Murphey 204
This class serves as an introduction to American Indian Studies. It begins with an exploration of the field’s origins and evolution. Then, throughout the semester, we will learn about the approaches adopted by archaeologists, historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, and specialists in law. You will gain a critical introduction to the questions asked by individuals working in these fields and to the “raw materials” of their various “ways of knowing,” including ethnographic interviews, oral histories, archival materials, artifacts, maps, language, place, forms of expressive culture, and material objects. Still more exciting, you will be learning directly from the outstanding American Indian Studies faculty at the University of North Carolina.

AMST 211. Introduction to the American South: A Cultural Journey
Instructors: Dr. Bernie Herman and Dr. Marcie Ferris
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am-12:15pm, Greenlaw 101
In the past, to discuss the South, we would first define the borders of the region, and theorize about what makes the South distinctive. The “old” map of the South traditionally referred to the eleven states of the former Confederacy, but today, these rigid borders are more fluid. The South “is found wherever southern culture is found,” existing “as a state of mind both within and beyond its geographical boundaries.” Beyond the question of what constitutes the South’s borders, a new vision of Southern Studies challenges conventional tropes of southern identity. The “new Southern Studies” considers landmarks of southern identity other than the Civil War, Reconstruction, and barbecue. Rather than the old white and black South, the “new Southern Studies” recognizes the diverse cultures and ethnicities of the South, whose global influences have shaped the region in powerful ways for centuries.
In this gateway course to the study of the American South, students will examine southern cultural identity, recognizing the contributions of all its people, including men and women of American Indian, African, Latino, Asian, and European descent. Students will consider the region in all its complexity through a multi-disciplinary conversation about the American South that considers art, archaeology, architecture, cultural tourism, ecology, folklife, foodways, geography, history, language, literature, material culture, myth and manners, music, politics, religion, values, and more. Throughout the semester, students will meet and work with scholars from our university community who study the region from a variety of disciplines and perspectives.
Course assignments will expose students to the unsurpassed resources of UNC’s Southern Historical Collection, Southern Folklife Collection, the North Carolina Collection, and the Southern Oral History Program, as well as southern collections at UNC’s Ackland Museum of Art, and other cultural and historical institutions in the region. Students will be encouraged to explore local cultural “repositories,” to taste the flavors of southern foodways, and to attend regional art happenings, lectures, literary readings, musical performances, and folklife events

AMST233. Native America: The West
Instructor: Dr. Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am-12:15pm, Philips 328
This course examines the history of Native peoples located in the western part of what is now the United States. It will focus on three major questions. How have Indigenous peoples encountered, navigated, and engaged various colonial powers in this region? How do tribal sovereignty, law, and policy inform the lives of Native men and women the West? How might engaging gender as a lens shape our understanding of the complex histories of Native peoples in the region?
To approach these and other issues, students will read a number of articles, historical documents, and following texts: Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Chief Manuelito and Juanita by Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Peace Came in the Form of a Woman by Juliana Barr, Cahokia: Ancient America’s Great City on the Mississippi by Timothy Pauketat, and We’re All Like Migrant Workers Here: Work, Community, and Memory on California’s Round Valley Reservation, 1850-1941 by William J. Bauer.

AMST290. Topics in American Studies – Indigenous Performance and Representation
Instructor: Dr. Angeline Shaka
Monday/Wednesday 3:00-4:15pm, Wilson 217
This interdisciplinary seminar course examines a broad range of artistic expression among the Indigenous people of the Americas, Canada, and the Pacific. Using specific case studies, we will consider how chosen performance strategies address many current political, cultural, and historical issues relating to understandings of indigeneity today. Our investigations will emphasize the centrality of performance both historically and in the modern world as a means of preserving and asserting Native cultural values in the present-day. Topics will include: performance and traditions in a Postmodern era, defining indigeneity through performing bodies, representations of the indigenous in drama, and Native stereotypes in film. In addition to reading contemporary theory and criticism and performance ethnographies, students will watch films and performances

AMST292. Historical Seminar in American Studies – The South in Black and White
Instructor: Dr. Tim Tyson
Tuesday 6:15-8:15pm, DUKE
The South in Black and White explores Southern history, politics and culture in the 20th century. This lecture and discussion course is open to students at Duke, UNC, NCCU, NC State, Durham Tech and the larger community. We will constitute a kind of front porch on Southern history and culture, where we will join those whom Zora Neale Hurston called “the big picture talkers” and hear their stories. We meet at the American Tobacco Campus on Tuesday nights in Downtown Durham. There will be live music, poetry, lectures, stories, discussions, oral histories, and dramatic performances. We will explore a history as rich and complicated, painful and delightful as the South itself. *This course counts for Southern Studies credit in History and Social Sciences.

AMST338. Native American Novel
Instructor: Dr. Chris Teuton
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:00-12:50pm, Bingham 317
At the heart of any Indigenous community you will find its stories. Stories passed on by word of mouth, through expressive art forms, and in writing all respond in creative and adaptive ways to the changing histories, lifeways, and circumstances of Native American peoples. Over the past forty years, the novel has become the single most important genre of Native American storytelling. In this class, we will read a wide variety of many of the best works of contemporary Indigenous novels from inside the territorial boundaries of the United States and Canada. In the course of our reading and discussion, we’ll engage the ideas and contexts these powerful works of literature invite us to consider.

AMST340. American Indian Art and Material Culture
Instructor: Dr. Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15, Greenlaw 222
This course examines American Indian art and material culture through interdisciplinary perspectives. Throughout the course students will gain a greater understanding of the role that the arts play in the social, cultural, and political life of American Indian peoples. This course will also explore a number of questions: What is the relationship between art and American Indian identities? How have Native artists negotiated various markets and audiences for their works? Over the course of the term students will read, discuss, and write about a number of objects and texts. In addition to articles and book chapters we will read Native North American Art, by Janet C. Berlo and Ruth B. Phillips, History of the Book in Indian Country by Phillip Round, No Deal! Indigenous Art and the Politics of Possession, edited by Tressa Berman, Object of Exchange: Social and Material Transformation in the late Nineteenth Century Northwest Coast, and The Painted Drum by Louise Erdrich.

AMST375. Food in America
Instructor: Dr. Marcie Ferris
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15pm, Greenlaw 302
AMST 375 examines the history and meaning of food in America and how our culinary cultures have shaped national, regional, and personal identity for over five centuries. To approach the unwieldy, vast history of American foodways, this course highlights selected historical moments, places, and people in the complex narrative of our country’s foodways. Rather than an encyclopedic overview of cuisine, AMST 375 steps beyond iconic dishes and recipes to examine a cultural conversation found in the historical interactions of Americans across time. Food is also a barometer of contemporary America, where a return to local food and small-scale, heritage agriculture exists alongside industrial farming. The challenges of our national food system—environmental degradation, sustainable agriculture, food access, and food-related disease—are especially acute in the American South, and have been throughout its history. We must consider how this history impacts current institutional policy and individual action. “Food in American Culture” considers the intersection of America’s multi-racial and multi-ethnic populations to explore the meaning of our nation’s ‘cuisine.’ Throughout the semester, students discuss food as both a source of healing and a source of conflict, and the ways in which it impacts community, from the American family to the “national family.”

AMST398. Service Learning in America: The Arts & Social Change
NOTE: INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED – Email ashackel@unc.edu for details.
Instructor: Dr. Aaron Shackelford, Carolina Performing Arts
Wednesday 3:30-6:20, Greenlaw 319
This seminar investigates the history of the arts as instruments of social change in America. Over the course of the semester we will study how artistic engagement enacts change in the culture and politics of the United States, beginning with abolitionist movements of the nineteenth century and continuing to present-day efforts. A large portion of this class will be student engagement in an arts-based service-learning project. All students will maintain a journal and series of critical reflections throughout their project. The student experiences in the community will provide a direct experience of the power – and challenges – of art as a catalyst for social change here in North Carolina.
As a course which fulfills the Experiential Education requirement, AMST 398 will require individual service-learning placements for a minimum of 30 hours outside of class time. Assistance in finding placements will be provided, and you are encouraged to think deeply about which opportunities will be most beneficial for your interests. If you have an idea for an alternative placement, please speak with me as soon as possible and we will discuss your options. You will be required to return APPLES contracts and placement supervisor contact information will be needed ASAP in the semester. Throughout the semester you will write at least four Critical Incident Reflections. You will also be responsible for leading one class discussion of at least 30 minutes that connects with your service-learning placement. *This course of study can become the basis for 100-300 hours of public service necessary for all Buckley Public Service Scholars participants.

AMST466. You Are Where You Live: The American House
Instructor: Dr. Kathy Roberts
Wednesday 3:30-6:20pm, Saunders 204
This course is designed to attune students to the complexities of human shelter. We will begin our journey by studying the development of several national and regional housing types in the U.S. and the environmental and socio-political factors that contributed to their formation. From shotguns to ranches to mobile homes and more, we will learn about how domestic forms in the built environment have contributed to American cultural landscapes—past and present. In addition, we will explore the social use and meaning of housing and examine the strategies people use to create “homes” out of built forms. Finally, we consider several larger issues associated with housing in the U.S., including affordability, sustainability and gentrification. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the built environment as a form of communication, capable of revealing what we value as individuals and communities and as a nation, and to critically evaluate the ways in which housing mediates power relations in the U.S.

AMST483. Seeing the USA: Visual Arts and American Culture – The Film Director as Public Intellectual
Instructor: Dr. Michelle Robinson
Wednesday 2:00-4:50pm, Greenlaw 222
This course will tentatively consider the filmmaker as “public intellectual,” an individual whose skillful orchestration of narrative techniques and formal elements generate compelling critiques of American society. We will examine works by a range of contemporary filmmakers, including Spike Lee, Wayne Wang, Todd Haynes, Robert Rodriguez, and others (to be determined by students). No previous experience in film studies is required, but you will be expected to develop or expand your knowledge of film techniques, grammar, history and theory, and to draw on the terminology of film studies in your written work. In addition to reading a very limited selection of essays and interviews, we will watch two films most weeks during the semester. Students will need to set up a Netflix/Amazon account and have time to view films out of class on their own schedule. If you are curious or passionate about cinema, I invite you to take this course!

AMST498. Advanced Seminar in American Studies
Instructor: Mike Wiley
Thursday 12:00-2:50pm, Greenlaw 316
This course is taught by visiting professor Mike Wiley, an actor, playwright and director of documentary theater. Teaches students about a powerful, experimental form of storytelling that complicates the relationships between documentary, narrative, past, and present. Students work directly with the professor conducting oral histories and archival research of African American life, including film footage, photographs, newspapers, letters and other sources to produce the raw material of documentary narratives. Professor Wiley and the students then convert this historical oral and archival research into a documentary theater performance. This course will illuminate both historical events and contemporary issues to show how art and scholarship document and change the world. Professor Wiley’s current project is the research and production of a one-person play about James Baldwin, one of America’s greatest writers and a crucial voice of the civil rights movement. Note: this is not an acting class.

ANTH 537. Gender and Performance (formerly FOLK)
Instructor: Patricia Sawin
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am-12:15pm, Wilson 217
In this course we explore the culturally and historically variable ways in which individuals constitute themselves as gendered subjects. We ground our study in theories of gender as a negotiated discursive accomplishment and as a recursive and malleable performance (rather than as an inherent or natural quality). Readings suggest the wide range of ways in which people draw upon both unmarked, everyday talk and action and on a variety of aesthetic performance forms—including narrative, pageant, song, dance, and material culture—in order to perform and potentially transform gendered selves. We further explore the ways in which gender performers, who necessarily rely upon extant expressive resources yet modify them, expand the options available to themselves and others. Each student will undertake their own ethnographic study of gender performance, working with a group or individual with whom they can interact over the course of the semester.

FOLK560. Southern Literature and the Oral Tradition
Instructor: Dr. Bill Ferris
Tuesday/Thursdays 8:00-9:15am
Center for the Study of the American South, 410 East Franklin St.
Graduate students enrolling in this course will also meet 9:30-10:30 on Tuesdays.
This course focuses on Southern writers and explores how they use oral traditions in their work. We will discuss the nature of oral tradition and how its study can provide a methodology for understanding Southern literature. We will consider how specific folklore genres such as folktales, sermons, and music are used by Southern writers, and we will discuss how such genres provide structure for literary forms such as the novel and the short story.
The seminar begins by exploring the nature of folklore and how its study has been applied to both oral and written literature. We will then consider examples of oral history and how they capture the southern voice. We will discuss how nineteenth century slave narratives by Harriet Ann Jacobs and Frederick Douglass and works by Tennessee Williams and Mark Twain deal with local color and black and white southern voices. After these readings, we will consider a rich selection of twentieth century Southern writers and discuss how they use folklore in their work.

AMST701. Interdisciplinary Research Methods
Instructor: Dr. Sharon Holland
Tuesday 3:30-6:20pm, New East 301
What is a method? Is it possible to actually tell someone how you do what you do? Or is a method just a collection of tools and our journey to find the right one? Or, more appropriately, is a method a guideline, often rigid, that we must follow, even over the creative cliff? In this course we will track discourses on method in American Studies and create new methodologies as we search for dry sand in muddy water, so to speak. This course will examine award winning books published in the last two years in American Studies whose methodologies challenge, if not compel us to rethink the category. This course will also traffic in debates about method across material culture, American Indian studies and american cultures more broadly. We will have occasion to revisit familiar icons of “American-ness” to search for novel ways in which to re-interpret their meaning in the age of social media. We will also utilize archival resources at our disposal. Students will be required to submit two short papers anytime during the semester and a group project at the end of the course.

AMST850 Digital Humanities Practicum
NOTE: INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED
Instructor: Dr. Robert C. Allen, James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Director, Digital Innovation Lab (rallen@email.unc.edu)
Thursday 3:30-6:30 pm, Greenlaw 431
This practicum blends traditional graduate seminar discussions with hands-on training and experience in the digital humanities. Students will work alongside DH practitioners in the Digital Innovation Lab, contributing to real-life projects that emphasize trans-domain, collaborative work. DIL projects share a commitment to engaged scholarship, representing partnerships with local communities. The practicum gives students the opportunity to pursue a set of professional development goals for themselves. Students will emerge from this practicum with a deeper understanding of digital humanities approaches, practices and issues, all of which will have be applied to their own project-based work and training.
Enrollment for this course is limited and is by permission of instructor. Please email Professor Allen with a statement of interest. Enrollment is open to MA and PHD students at UNC and (via interinstitutional registration) to graduate students at Duke, and NCSU. Disciplinary diversity is valued.
Structure: The DIL Graduate DH Practicum combines hands-on training in a real-world DH laboratory setting with regular seminar-styled meetings and engagement with a broader Carolina DH community.
1. Lab Work
Students will contribute 8 hours/week to ongoing project work in the DIL, as assigned and monitored by the instructor in consultation with the DIL Manager. The particular role each student will play within the project team will depend upon his/her skills, background, professional goals, and experience in relation to the needs of the project. The DIL is committed to maintaining an ambitious and diverse project agenda focused on 1) the development of digital humanities tools, platforms, and work processes, 2) the testing of these tools in practical application through collaborative projects with faculty, other university units, cultural heritage organizations, and other universities, 3) project-based work developed through the programmatic expression of the Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative , including the DIL/IAH Faculty Fellowship Program, Postdoctoral Fellows Program, and CDHI-supported faculty. Students may also propose new interdisciplinary, collaborative projects. Approval of these new projects by the instructor is contingent upon their fit with the mission and priorities of the DIL, the capability of the student to undertake the project proposed, technical requirements, and the capacity of the DIL to support them.
Students will work closely with the DIL Manager to develop a set of professional development goals at the beginning of the semester (for instance, learning XML, or gaining experience in project management).
2. Weekly Seminars
In addition to working in the Lab, the Practicum will provide a regular opportunity for engaged conversations about the theoretical and conceptual issues and challenges raised by the project upon which they are working. The purpose of these seminars (Thursdays, 3:30-6:30, 431 Greenlaw) is to offer a theoretical underpinning for the students’ work in the Lab, while exposing students to a broad range of DH practices and issues. A portion of the seminar may be devoted to discussing Lab work.

FOLK860/ANTH860. The Art of Ethnography
Instructor: Dr. Glenn Hinson
Tuesday/Thursday 9:30-10:45am, Greenlaw 526A
To many, the combination of the terms “art”—with its implications of creativity and aesthetic engagement—and “ethnography”—the practice of engaged community study, with the end of deeper cultural understanding—might seem a bit odd. But this layering speaks rather pointedly to the ways we’ll approach ethnography in this graduate seminar, treating it as more than mere process and skill, and as more than just research and writing. Ethnography—as a process based in conversation and the search for shared understanding—is inherently creative. It’s always a “making,” an enacting that begins with conversations in the “field,” moves into domains of intimate sharing and mutual realization, and eventually finds voice in various forms of artful representation. All these realms of enactment involve a host of choices that ethnographers and their consultants creatively make throughout the course of their engagement. In the field, these choices encompass such matters as with whom to speak; how to present oneself in that speaking; how and with whom to craft bonds of collaboration; how to offer oneself as student, friend, and colleague; how to enact an ethic of caring and equity; and how to measure one’s emergent understanding. In crafting the representation, choices involve what to include and what to leave out; when to give voice to consultants and when to speak for self; how to frame and how to order and how to story. In these arenas of dialogue and subjective choice lies the art in ethnography.
This seminar invites students to journey from the classroom to the community to practice this art and to investigate the complexities of community meaning. Over the course of the semester, we will both explore various fieldwork techniques and wrestle with the entanglements of ethnographic representation. Since the only way to “learn” how to “do” this is to actually enter the field, we will each be planning, conducting, and reporting on a semester-long field project; in so doing, we’ll craft collaborative partnerships with both our consultants in the community and our peers in the classroom.